The comic magazine MAD is legendary. Characterized by the cheeky grin of Alfred E-Neumann, it kept its void going for almost 70 years. This era finally came to an end in autumn 2019 when DC published the last issue of this magazine. Since then, MAD is publishing only old stories. MAD had held out for 67 years, but it was over.

Alfred E. Neumann Puts On His Sailing Ears
Alfred E. Neumann Puts On His Sailing Ears

Alfred E. Neumann has finally put on his sail ears. Political parodies and satirical stories were among the great strengths of this comic magazine. Before the publishers founded MAD, nobody had dared to be so cheeky and disrespectful about the ongoing topics. The illustrator Harvey Kurtzman was responsible for the healthy appearance of this comic magazine.

Born Out of An Argument

Harvey Kurtzman started working in the industry at the age of 18. At first, he only had to paint black areas, but his bosses soon recognized the uprising talent. A few years later, he published his first individual work. He worked for Stan Lee and his magazine “Timely Comics”. When his boss no longer wanted to pay him salary before presenting his ideas, it was time to create the magazine MAD out of nowhere. A provocation by his superior led to the birth of the legendary comic magazine. Kurtzman demonstrated keen observation and quickly put his ideas into practice. MAD promptly became successful, but its creator had to go. After a dispute, a new editor-in-chief replaced him. MAD became an integral part of American pop culture. The New York Times once described Harvey Kurtzman as one of the most influential people in the United States after 1945, and it was nothing but the truth.

Numerous Prominent Followers

Now it is over with MAD, and it seems like an end of a significant era. However, there still are many fans of this irreplaceable magazine. Many of them grew up with the magazine and missed its biting humor. That also includes the author of the Simpsons Josh Weinstein. He thanked the publishers publicly on behalf of countless generations of MAD fans for the laughter and inspiration. Comedy legend Weird Al Yankovich was also deeply saddened by the end of MAD. He even saw this comic magazine as having a decisive influence on his career as a comedian.

Numerous Prominent Followers
Numerous Prominent Followers

The farewell to MAD was anything but surprising. In its heyday, the magazine had two million subscribers. But the sharp drop in readership also hit Alfred E. Neumann hard. Circulations and revenues fell worldwide, and MAD was no exception. During the year, the number of printed magazines had finally reached 140,000. It was then clear that things couldn’t go on like this. MAD had been a cult for its readers for many generations. In the last years of its existence, however, fewer and fewer buyers could do anything with the comic. In the previous year, the time had come. MAD is now a historical figure and an inspiring memory about comic books; fans will never forget what Alfred E. Neumann meant for them.